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Global Dance: an informal exchange of dance and music traditions from across the world presented by the Boyer College of Music and Dance.

Temple University students are encouraged to come and share dance and music traditions that reflect their heritage.

When: Friday, Sept. 4

7:30 p.m.

Conwell Dance Theater, Broad and Montgomery Streets

Admission is free

Tyler Craft & Cheese exhibit - open until Sept. 5

Tyler Craft & Cheese : an exhibit of graduate work in fiber, glass and cermanics open through Sept. 5

Second year graduate glass, fibers and ceramics students will exhibit their work through Sept. 5 in the Stella Elkins Gallery located in the basement of the Tyler School of Art, 1201 N 13th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122.

The gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. A Closing Reception will be held on Thursday Sept. 3, 5pm to 7pm. exhibit

Author Linh Dinh will read from his work at Temple University Center City Campus 1515 Market Street, Room 222 Thursday, September 3, 2009 – 8:00 P.M.

Dinh was born in Saigon, Vietnam, in 1963. He came to the US in 1975 and

Linh Đinh (born 1963) is a bilingual poet, fiction writer, essayist and translator will read his work during the Poets & Writers series

Linh Đinh (born 1963) is a bilingual poet, fiction writer, essayist and translator will read his work during the Poets & Writers series

has lived in Italy and England. He is the author of two collections of stories, Fake House (2000) and Blood and Soap (2004; chosen by the Village Voice as one of the best books of its year), four books of poems, All Around What Empties Out (2003), American Tatts (2005), Borderless Bodies (2006) and Jam Alerts (2007), with a novel, Love Like Hate, scheduled for release in 2009 from Seven Stories Press. His work has been anthologized in Best American Poetry 2000, 2004, 2007 and Great American Prose Poems from Poe to the Present.

He is the editor of the anthologies Night, Again: Contemporary Fiction from Vietnam (1996) and Three Vietnamese Poets (2001), and is the translator of Night, Fish and Charlie Parker and the poetry of Phan Nhien Hao (2006). His work has been translated into Italian, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Portuguese, Japanese, Arabic, Icelandic and Finnish, and he has read all over the US, as well as London, Cambridge, Paris, Berlin and Reykjavik. He has also published widely in Vietnamese.

The event is free and open to the public.

Temple English professor says vampires popularity lives as long as they do -- forever.

Temple English professor says vampires popularity lives as long as they do -- forever.

Vampires and zombies, both of which became a popular phenomenon in Victorian Britain, are all the rage. Temple English Professor Peter Logan believes this is no mere pop culture trend, but rather a reflection of the strong parallels between that period in Britain and our own here in the U.S.

Victorian Britain was the first industrialized society and the dominant world super power of the nineteenth century. At the height of the Victorian period, one quarter of the world’s population were British subjects.

“It was the beginning of the world as we know it today, and it was beset with some of the same problems associated with being a world power that we are currently facing,” Logan said.

But, while vampires were popular during the nineteenth century — just as we see today in the hit HBO series True Blood and the Twilight series of books and movies — the phenomenon didn’t start with Dracula.

Visit the Temple Newsroom for audiocast and more.

 – Kim Fischer

Temple student films

August 18, 2009

To see the latest Temple student films, check out the department of Film and Media Arts video gallery

The program offers a four year undergraduate degree and a three year MFA degree to some 700 undergraduates and 40 graduate students. Many accomplished and successful media makers have gone through the program. They include Larry McConkey, (steadicam operator on Kill Bill, Vanilla Sky, Three Kings, and many other major studio films), Keith Fulton and Lou Pepe (Lost in La Mancha), Ross Katz (Lost in Translation), and Derek Guiley (writer on Chasing Liberty).

Barrymore Awards nominees

August 13, 2009

Three Temple Theater Department alumni, a current M.F.A. student, a full-time faculty member and an adjunct professor have all been nominated for the prestigious 2009 Barrymore Awards, the “Tony Award” of Philadelphia Metro Theater.

Here’s a list of the Temple nominees:

Temple alumna, Elena Bossler (pictured on left) was among several Barrymore nominees. Bossler was nominated for her role as Sudsy Squirrel in the People’s Light and Theatre production of

Temple alumna, Elena Bossler (left) was among several Barrymore nominees. Bossler was nominated for her role as Sudsy Squirrel in the People’s Light and Theatre production of Cinderella.

ELENA BOSSLER (BA ’08) – Outstanding Leading Actress in a Play – “Anna Bella? Eema” (Gas & Electric Arts)?

ELENA BOSSLER (BA ’08) – Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Musical “Cinderella” (People’s Light & Theatre)

ELENA BOSSLER (BA ’08) – Oustanding Ensemble in a play – “Anna Bella Ema”(Gas and Electric Arts)

KEITH CONALLEN (alum)– Oustanding Actor in a Play “Jump Cut” (Flashpoint Theatre Company)

KALA MOSES BAXTER (BA ‘96) – Oustanding Actress in a Play “Gee’s Bend” (Arden Theatere Company)

KALA MOSES BAXTER (BA ’96) –Nominated for the F. Otto Haas Award for an Emerging Philadelphia Theatre Artist.

KATHRYN PETERSEN (current M.F.A Playwriting Graduate Student) – Outstanding New Play -?”Cinderella” (People’s Light & Theatre)

DAVID INGRAM – (Associate Professor) Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Play – “The Rant” (InterAct?Theatre)

JENNIE EISENHOWER (current adjunct professor) – Outstanding Leading Actress in A Musical – “Forbidden Broadway’s Greatest Hits” (Walnut Street Theatre, Independence Studio on 3)

-Jazmyn Burton

Everyone, or so it seems, is talking about Mad Men, the critically-acclaimed AMC drama series known for its visual style and historical authenticity. Set in 1960’s

Temple historian Beth Bailey comments on how historical accuracy helps push the Mad Men storyline. Set in 1960’s New York City, Mad Men centers a high-level advertising creative director on Madison Avenue.

Temple historian Beth Bailey comments on how historical accuracy supports the Mad Men storyline.

New York City, Mad Men centers on Don Draper (Jon Hamm), a high-level advertising creative director at the fictional Sterling Cooper advertising agency on Madison Avenue. The series has won numerous awards and Emmy nominations.

In anticipation of Mad Men’s third season, which is scheduled to begin Sunday, August 16, Temple historian Beth Bailey commented on the show’s historical accuracy and how that accuracy helps to move the drama forward.

“What’s so interesting is the way in which mood is created by historically accurate framing that is chosen with an enormous amount of sophistication to create a sense of character, personality and relationship. Each character has a well-thought out back story that is embodied in the way the dress, the furnishings they choose and the places in which they appear. These are not just part of backdrop,” Bailey said.

Read more of Bailey’s comments on Mad Men in the Temple Newsroom

– Kim Fisher