TEMPLE SMASH

May 28, 2010

Temples student-produced variety show Smash Television recently recorded its fourth episode. Performed before a live studio audience, the SNL-style production features sketch comedy acts, stand up routines, musical groups and other entertainers, mostly drawn from the Temple student body.

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This weekend The Art Sanctuary will host it’s 26th annual Celebration of Black Writing Festival on the Temple University Campus.

The Celebration of Black Writing aims to deepen Philadelphia’s literary life with a rich infusion of African-American writers in all genres . Writers will discuss their work in panels and workshops; the week’s events include a basketball tournament, teachers’ symposium, a family pavilion, live performances and a variety of family centered events.

On Friday, May 28 Art Sanctuary will present the 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award to world-renowned poet, writer, commentator, activist and educator Nikki Giovanni. One of the most widely read American poets, Giovanni prides herself on being “a Black American, a daughter, a mother and a professor of English.”

Other events include : Objects, Memory & Story: Transform Your Stories Into Writing, 12:45 p.m. – 2 p.m. Saturday, May 29, Temple University, Ritter Hall Annex – Walk Auditorium

Through a series of interactive exercises, writer and memoirist Lise Funderburg (Pig Candy) will help workshop-goers uncover the stories and memories they’ve attached to personal objects and put them down on paper. Participants: You are encouraged, but not required, to bring an object of personal significance to the workshop.

Art Sanctuary is located in the Church of the Advocate at 18 and Diamond Streets in North Philadelphia. Visit artsanctuary.org for a schedule of events.


Michel Boufadel, professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, is currently studying deep-sea leaks like the one in the Gulf of Mexico

Unlike a surface spill, the crude oil in the Gulf of Mexico is gushing from underwater and so no one is sure where or when it will all emerge. Michel Boufadel, professor and chair of Temple’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, seeks to answer these questions in his lab using raw computing power. Boufadel is a veteran oil-spill researcher who is best known for his study of contamination from the Exxon Valdez tanker spill in Alaska. In addition to the gulf spill and the Exxon Valdez, he has turned his sights on the new wave of drilling for natural gas in Pennsylvania, in the Marcellus Shale formation. He says he was drawn to the study of engineering because he enjoys logic. “Engineering is a discipline where things have to make sense, where things have to follow a certain logic,” Boufadel says. To read more about Boufadel’s work visit the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Photo by Temple University Photo Services

If you missed the ceremony there’s still time to view the highlights on Temple’s University Communications homepage where you can view some of the outstanding photos taken by University Photo Services or  visit the 2010 Commencement website to read stories about the Temple’s graduates.