John Douglas, associate professor in the Department of Voice and Opera and music director and conductor of Temple University Opera Theater, lost his battle with cancer yesterday. He was 54.

Boyer College of Music and Dance associate professor John Douglas lost his battle with cancer this week. He was 54

Since joining Temple’s faculty in 1989, Douglas directed 50 productions and brought the opera program to national prominence, garnering four prestigious National Opera Awards and receiving rave reviews for cutting edge productions. He was honored with the Temple University Faculty Award for Creative Achievement in 2006.
Douglas ensured each of the twice-annual, fully-staged productions were meticulously produced so that students had performance opportunities that would groom them for major operatic roles. In an April 2010 interview with The Philadelphia Daily News he said, “We treat our productions in the same conceptual way that are done in a professional company, with no less time, interest or detail.”

Read the full obituary here.

Temple University Opera Theater's 'The Cunning Little Vixen.' Valerie Gay (Jay), Grant Uhle (Woodpecker) and Chad Summers (Badger) Joseph Labolito, Temple University Photography

Little-noticed Temple University company performs stellar shows

By TOM DI NARDO
Philadelphia Daily News

EVER SINCE the Academy of Music opened in 1857 with Verdi’s “Il Trovatore,” Philadelphia has been a mecca for opera lovers. Within just a few blocks of the academy, the home of the Opera Company of Philadelphia and the oldest opera house still in use, are two of the world’s great conservatories, the Academy of Vocal Arts and Curtis Institute. Both not only stage operas but train future stars in the operatic constellation.

Yet, less than two miles north on Broad Street, the Temple University Opera Theater has been consistently presenting two superb shows each season, with little fanfare and not much attention.

In recent years, their “Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “Candide,” “Falstaff,” and brilliant double bill of “L’Enfant et les Sortileges” and “Le Rossignol” still register strongly in the memory. But opera mavens who regularly travel to the Met in New York and Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., never head five subway stops up Broad Street for Temple’s performances.

That’s their loss.

Read the full story on Philly.com